Question:
I am doing a catering job for 400 teen agers. I would like to do a pizza bake which consists of penne pasta ground beef and sausage and pizza sauce. Can you tell me how much product I will need to buy. Knowing me I will make too much.

Answer:
Hello! There are too many variables for me to give you an exact order, as I don't know which recipe you're going to use. Instead, I suggest the following: First you need to decide which recipe you want to use; what's the ratio of meats & sauce, to pasta? What is the portion size per person? How many does this recipe yield, and do you think this is a realistic size portion for the ever-hungry typical teenager? Will you be serving other foods besides the pasta bake? Does this all fit into your budget; ie, are you covering your expenses and making your desired profit? Grab a calculator and bulk it up for around 400, depending on the above answers. Let me know how it goes for you! Good luck!



Question:
I am giving a dinner party for 14. I purchased 4 chateaubriand, each 2 pounds. I have only one oven and I know that I want the internal temp to be 125 for rare. I am used to cooking just one piece but approximately how much time should I plan for all four roasts in the same oven.

Answer:
The best way to go about this would be to increase the cooking time by 10 - 15 minute increments and check them as needed. It's hard for me to be more accurate than that since I don't know what temperature you're roasting at, and the fact that all ovens run differently. Keep in mind that the more you open the oven door, the cooler you're oven will get, and it will take a couple of minutes to get back up to temperature. Be sure to allow the chateaubriands to rest about 15 minutes before slicing.



Question:
I want to thank you for being so generous with your recipes. Through Chef Google, I have found many of them online. I own "Family Suppers" -- which is beyond fabulous!!! kol hak'vod!!!!

Answer:
Thanks so much for writing! We're always happy to share recipes, and your e-mail made us feel really good about it. We enjoyed working on Family Suppers, hope to have our third book available soon.
Happy cooking!



Question:
How do you season a stainless steel skillet?

Answer:
Seasoning a stainless steel skillet is not necessary. Seasoning a pan is usually done with the cast iron ones. Seasoning a cast iron pan prevents foods from sticking to the cooking surface. To season a pan coat the cooking surface with vegetable oil, then place the pan in the oven for 1 hour at 350 F. DO NOT do this with your stainless steel pan! When cooking in your stainless steel pan, just be sure to heat the oil until very hot, but not smoking before putting your items in. A hot pan will create a nice char or crisp seared item. If you don't want color on something, as when you might lightly sautee vegetables, you can start them in a cooler pan.



Question:
My boyfriend makes the best hash browns in the entire world -- but only at his house. His recipe is pretty simple - grated potatoes (must be a low-moisture variety like Idaho), olive oil, pepper, garlic, and Montreal Steak Seasoning. There are only two known differences between his house and mine -- 1) he has a cast iron skillet and I don't (can't afford one), and 2) he stores his potatoes under the sink whereas I store mine in the fridge. We have discovered that In an aluminum skillet his hash browns are passable but not great, and in a teflon pan they are almost inedible. They turn grey and develop an almost gluey texture. What modifications to his recipe does he need to make to different pan types and refrigerated vs under-the-sink potatoes?

Answer:
Thanks for sending in this very detailed question. You've answered much of it yourself. Your boyfriend wins the best hash brown maker title for several of the reasons you noted...
Keeping the potatoes out of the fridge will limit the amount of moisture they absorb, (as well as odors). Keeping potatoes (and onions) in a cool, dark pantry is usually best. Try to avoid under the sink, if any cleaning products are kept under there, too.
The cast iron skillet is great for holding the heat, therefore allowing the potatoes to crisp up nicely. The drier the potato, the better. If you use another type of potato, just be sure squeeze out the moisture that builds up while it sits in the bowl. Conversely, aluminum pans are thin, and will not retain heat as well. Stainless steel will work well, too.
In addition to this, it's very important that the oil be hot before the batter goes in. The heat should be medium-high. Too low of a flame will allow it to cook, but not crisp. Once it begins to fry, let it sit... no poking around or peeking underneath unnecessarily. This will prevent steam getting under the potatoes and causing a soggy, mushy hash brown. You'll be able to see the crisp brown edges soon enough.
I hope this has been helpful. Let us know how the next batch turns out!



Question:
I look forward to watching more Jewish cooking with Jeff. He is a delight to watch. Makes you want to run to the kitchen and "start cooking"!

Answer:
Thanks so much letting us know how much you're enjoying the show! Hopefully you've had a chance to cook some of those great recipes!



Question:
I watched your "Throw Down" with Bobby Flay featuring the Matzo Ball soup. My question is Schmaltz - what is it and how do I make it or where can I buy it? I've never had Matzo Ball Soup and can't wait to make it and try it.

Answer:
We're so glad you enjoyed the show and learned something new!
Schmaltz is simply rendered chicken fat. The golden pools atop any regular chicken broth, or even the pan drippings from roasted chicken can both be used as schmaltz. In generations past, schmaltz was used in a similar way to butter... as a spread and as a cooking medium. For Jeff's winning Throwdown recipe, the schmaltz is used as a final drizzle of flavor atop the soup.
Refrigerated chicken fat can be purcahsed, but it's more economical to use it from your own cooking. An easy way to garner it is to spoon it off the top of fresh simmered chicken broth. Or once the broth has cooled, removing the solidified fat will also do the trick. I do recommend to strain it though, to remove any addtional broth particles. It can be refrigerated for a few days, or frozen for a few weeks. As with all fats, it does not last indefinately!
Have fun in the kitchen! Let us know how your soup turns out.



Question:
Can you please give me the Panko chicken cutlets recipe from the Chol Hamoed Passover menu. Its the only chicken my daughter will eat!

Answer:
So glad to know that your daughter liked the Chicken Tenders. It's one of our most popular dishes during Passover.
Please click here for a grown up version of the recipe. Note the breading procedure for the chicken... this is the part your daughter liked.



Question:
I plan on serving potato pancakes for 12 people. Can I make them ahead of the event and reheat them and still have them be crisp and not soggy at serving time?

Answer:
Yes you can fry the latkes ahead of time. Just be sure to cook them all the way through. When you re-heat them, do so at a high temp oven just until they're glistening and hot.



Question:
Hi Chef Nathan,
A few things: First, I would like to compliment you on an excellent family dinner we had at Abigael's tonight, celebrating a happy occasion- my brother's graduation from medical school.
Dining as a family, we sampled each others' plates; needless to say, everyone was thoroughly pleased with their (and everyone else's) food. However, the starter that was voted the hands-down winner was the Wild Mushroom Polenta. At the risk of being in bad taste, can you recommend of a way for me to recreate this dish at home? It was a perfect way to start...
Everyone left happy and satisfied and hoping for more happy occasions to commemorate (or, in fact, looking for happy occasions to celebrate) with such excellent food!


Answer:
We're delighted to know that your family all enjoyed celebrating your brother's graduation at Abigael's. The polenta dish is one of our top sellers and most people love it as much as you did! You can view the Soft Polenta with Wild Mushroom Ragout recipe here. I hope you enjoy cooking it at home.
Hundreds of other recipes are in Jeff's cookbooks, Adventures in Jewish Cooking and Jeff Nathan's Family Suppers. Both cookbooks are available through our website.



Question:
I am making chicken kiev after i bread and roll up the chicken the recipe says to fry about 2-3 min and then bake in 300 degree oven for about 15-20 min my question is can i fry the chicken early in the morning refrigerate the piece and then bake them later in the day i dont have a meat thermometor.

Answer:
Yes, you can pan fry the breaded chicken ahead of time, and continue cooking it later on. Be sure to only lightly cover the fried chicken before putting it in the fridge. This will prevent it from getting too soggy, where it won't properly crisp up in the oven. It will also allow the heat to escape quickly and minimize any bacterial growth.
Once they're in the oven, bake them uncovered according to your recipe's directions. When done, they should be golden and sizzling on the outer breading part. To test the inside of the Kievs, insert a metal skewer into the thickest part. Carefully place the center of the heated skewer to your upper lip. It should feel hotter than your body temperature. Do not overbake, as all your filling might ooze out.



Question:
A few years ago I printed your blintz souffle recipe, but I can't seem to find it. Can you help me out?

Answer:
Thanks for the e-mail you sent regarding the recipes of Jeff Nathan. You can see the Cheese Blintz Casserole recipe here.
Hundreds of others recipes are in Jeff's cookbooks, Adventures in Jewish Cooking and Jeff Nathan's Family Suppers. Both cookbooks are available through our website.



Question:
Kosher truffles?

Answer:
Truffles are a type of mushroom, and therefore no hechsher is necessary. Depending on where you live, you can purchase them in specialty shoppes or upscale grocers. They are very expensive due to the labor intensive harvesting and importing from France, Italy, and locally from Oregon. When purchasing, choose well shaped truffles with no sign of blemishes. They should be used fairly soon, but can be stored up to 3 days in the fridge. Truffle oil is also available as a kosher product.
Unless of course you were referring to Chocolate Truffles, which are a different product all together. Chocolate truffles can be found kosher at some of the finer chocolatiers and by mail order.



Question:
How to roast eggs in the oven for Passover

Answer:
Place a raw egg, still in its shell on a small baking dish. Bake in a 350 oven for 25 minutes. Cool and place on seder plate.
Cook and peel a hard boiled egg. Place on a greased baking dish and roast in a 350 oven for 15 minutes until tlightly browned. Cool and place on seder plate.
Cook and peel a hard boiled egg. Place the egg within one of the other food items you'll be preparing for the seder. Allow to cook for at least 15 minutes. Cool and place on seder plate.
Cook and peel a hard boiled egg. Using a pair of tongs, hold the egg over the flame of the stove. Char on several sides. Place the browned egg on the seder plate.



Question:
I always braise deckle for the holidays but someone told me that you have a recipe to dry roast it. Cutting onions and other vegetables on the bottom, no liquid and cover roasting pan tightly with foil. I'm afraid it will dry out. Help!

Answer:
The deckle is the top part of the rib eye cut. It doesn't need to be braised, as it's pretty tender to start. Pan roasted, sauteed or grilled is the best way to cook this. Using a dry rub with any of these methods will no doubt be delicious! Briskets however, are cuts from the tougher end of things! They usually need to be braised in small amount of broth or other liquids and sliced thin to make them as tender as possible.



Question:
Years ago while visiting an aunt she made a dish with chicken parts, necks are what I remember but it might have had wings and gizzards, (can't remember) It reminded me of a soup and that's how we ate it, but it was jammed with chicken necks and I think thicker that soup. If I think now on how to reproduce it I would saute onion, carrots, garlic and the chicken parts, add chicken broth, maybe a bay, but how do I get it thick. I don't even have a name for this and my aunt might have made it up. Can you help. Thank you!

Answer:
The dish you are fondly recalling is a classic in many cultures. In France it is known as a pot-au-feu; in Italy it is a pollo misto; the Sephardim call it soupa de kippur and in Ashkenazic culture it is known as hoon in dehr tuf. In America we call it chicken in the pot. It is a dish made of (sometimes )meat, chicken and vegetables and served straight from the pot. The broth is served as a first course soup, and the meat and vegetables as the main course. To thicken up the broth, add diced potatoes, barley or rice. I hope you enjoy having this dish again. It's a family favorite in many households.



Question:
When making whole wheat pizza dough i use 1 1/2 cups whole wheat an 2 cups bread flour my question is if i add gluten will i get a crust that is xtra chewy if so how much gluten should I add? Thanx for your help chef!!

Answer:
You already have a certain amount of gluten within the bread flour. Kneading the dough, and allowing it to proof builds the gluten, and so adding more is not recommended. Instead, try baking in a very hot oven for a little less time than you are currently doing. Let us know how it turns out!



Question:
Most of my family recipes contain onions but they wreak havoc on my husband's stomach. What can I do to maintain the flavor of my soups, sauces and other recipes without using onions?

Answer:
Depending on the purpose of the use on the onions in your recipes there are a variety of substitutions you may want to try. For flavoring soups and stews, try shallots or leeks which are both part of the onion family. Or to avoid anything in the onion family, use celery, sweet bell peppers, fennel or toasted cumin. For recipes that have onion in it for textures, as in salsas, salads and spreads, consider using cabbage, daikon, black or red radish, fresh fennel (anise), sweet bell peppers or jicama. I hope this helps! Have fun figuring out which ones you and your husband enjoy most!



Question:
Making homemade meatballs and I added the oil for cooking to mixture. Huge mistake. Can this be corrected?

Answer:
It's not a problem at all. I like the extra addition of fat to meatballs. I also add some water to keep them light and moist. You'll just need additional oil to cook with.



Question:
Hi Chef - I have a very generous duck hunting neighbor who often gives me fresh wild duck breasts. I know that the fashionable way to cook them is seared very rare with a pan sauce, but my husband will NOT eat rare meat. I have tried braising them, but they are always as tough as old boots. I know I am doing something wrong. How can I get tender, well done duck - should I try a pressure cooker?

Answer:
The breast meat will not get tender because it is so lean. I suggest making a confit of the leg and thigh and slowly braise the leg and thigh as you would brisket and it will be wonderful! Pan searing the breast is best but after searing the breast, continue to cook it in the oven until just cooked through... remember that even after removing it from the oven it will continue to cook for another 10 minutes or so. Allow it to rest and cool slightly. Slice it super thin and it will be much more tender to the bite.



Question:
I'm making a Trifle for Christmas. I made pound cake. Want to know how soon I can make cream and how early I can safely assemble before Sunday?

Answer:
Whipped cream will hold up about two days, sealed tightly and stored in the fridge. It will lose it's light airiness as it sits and become more like an ice cream consistency though. Strong odors in the fridge will also affect the cream, so be sure it's wrapped really well. For a trifle, I would recommend that you prepare the cream just a few hours ahead of time (no more than 12 hours), and then prepare the trifle. Cover it tightly, and then just before serving, add the final layer of cream. Keep in mind that your pound cake and fruits can be cut a day or so ahead of time.



Question:
I need to grind poppy seeds, can I use my kitchen aid grinder attachment? If so, which blade?

Answer:
Since poppy seeds are so small, you'd need to use the finest blade possible. Chances are, a spice grinder, coffee grinder or pestle and mortar will be your best options.



Question:
I just bought a new pair of chef pants, the right side pocket is normal but my left side pocket is divided in two--one small part and one larger part. What is the reason of this?

Answer:
The little pocket is to hold your loose change. This can keep your hand free of the germs associated with handling money while you're cooking. Have a great holiday season!



Question:
Do you have any recipes you could recommend for cheese sauces for pasta and / or fettuccine Alfredo that are not too high in cholesterol? I can handle the fat content (i hope) but the cholesterol is a serious issue and was wondering if you had any ideas.

Answer:
Great question, but you're not going to like my answer... Cheese sauces are inherently high in cholesterol, as well as fat. While you might be able to play around with the quantities, or use a low fat dairy product, or even substitute tofu for creamy ricotta, it is more than likely you will not enjoy it as much as you're hoping to. Instead of fussing with what brings you pleasure, I would instead recommend that begin to enjoy the many great dishes out there that are not fat and cholesterol based. Foods that are baked or grilled, dressed with vinaigrettes and gravies, instead of sauces are excellent choices. When a special occasion allows, or perhaps as a treat once or twice a month, enjoy your favorite Fettuccine Alfredo or Baked Ziti. Eat it in moderation, but know that it was worth the indulgence. I wish you good luck with this dietary change. Good for you for taking it seriously!



Question:
Help, my noodle kugel with cornflake crumb toppings is dry!!!! What can I do to add moisture to it. It's for tonite!!!

Answer:
Fear not, as the dry crumbs are to add texture and crunch to an otherwise soft product. Food is not just about the taste and smell, but also about the mouth feel. However, if in future, you prefer to have it a little softer, try this trick... spritz on a bit of olive oil spray. If it's a dairy kugel, you can use a butter flavored one. Or dampen a paper towel with water and allow it to rest atop the kugel for a few minutes before serving.



Question:
Just wanted to let you know your recipes are terrific. Our most favorite is the confit of salmon. I have shared your recipe with so many people. Thank you so much for all your inspiration! Much health and happiness to you and your family.

Answer:
Thanks so much for your kind words! The Salmon Confit is one of our favoirite recipes, too! We're delighted that you've been enjoying it. If memory serves me correctly, you may have gotten that recipe from one of our demonstrations at De Gustibus at Macy's Cooking School. If that's the case, you might like to know that we've got another demonstration coming up on November 1, 2011. In the meantime, we wish you a good year, and an easy fast!



Question:
Can I use cream of wheat in a soup? will it thicken the soup or will it be similar to other grains like the barley soup?

Answer:
The cream of wheat will act as a thickener, not just a bulky grain like rice, barley or even pasta. If you use it in a small quantity it may add a nice texture. Too much and you will end up with porridge. It will also thicken as it sits, so be wary if you do decide to expiriment and play around in the kitchen.



Question:
Why do we toast the kasha with egg white before we cook it? Does it have a purpose? We do it like this for centuries in our family but i never understood why :-)

Answer:
The kasha is coated in egg whites and then dry toasted in the pan so that when you add the broth, the grain will keep and nice firm texture. If it is not coated and toasted the kasha will absorb the broth too readily and turn to a mushy oatmeal-like consistency. Once cooked it will also be light and fluffy, which tosses better with the noodles when making the traditional kasha varnishkas.



Question:
As an avid BBQ Grill Master the hot topic is whether or not Kosher Poultry needs to be brined before grilling/roasting because the Kashering process already accounts for salting and soaking the poultry. What are your thoughts on the matter?

Answer:
Thanks for a great question! You don't need to brine at all using kosher poultry. However, some people do brine, just to vary the flavoring of the bird. This would be done with a brine that is not salt based, as most of them are. When brining a kosher bird it is usually done to a turkey which warrants a long cooking time. Not really worth the fuss for a chicken. Have fun in the kitchen... and at the grill!



Question:
Love your show "New Jewish Cuisine." I am very much in favor of that line of thinking. old school is the best but that doesn't mean you cant make changes/add something new. For Passover, I want to add a "spin" to gefilte fish. maybe some finely chopped jalapeno mashed in the fish balls?? maybe ... I don't know. that is why I am turning to the Master. Please throw me some ideas.

Answer:
Thanks for your great comments about New Jewish Cuisine. Gefilte Fish is that one dish that we all love for the holidays, and yet we're always hoping to swith it up a bit. The jalapeno idea is interesting, but might be overpowering. It's possible that not all your guests will like the additional spice. However, using it sparingly just might add that extra nuance you're looking for. Another idea is the addition of fresh herbs... thyme, dill or cilantro can each add something special and interesting. Also the jazzing up of the accompaniments can also help. How about a horseradish vinaigrette, instead of just the horseradish. Or serve the gefilte fish atop a salad of beet greens and beets. I hope this has helped. For more holiday ideas, you can check out my cookbooks ~ Adventures in Jewish Cooking and Jeff Nathan's Family Suppers. Let us know how it's turned out!



Question:
No matter what I do my matzo balls turn out as cannon balls. My friends use the matzo ball mix instead of matzo meal but I prefer to make mine from scratch. What can I do to make them light and fluffy?

Answer:
This is a question that is often asked! There are some recipes that use seltzer, whipped egg whites or baking soda / powder to help aerate and expand the matzo balls. However, the real trick which you will rarely find in a recipe is in the length of time and size of pot that you simmer them in. Here are some suggestions that might help: Don't over mix your batter. Stir until just combined. Be sure to use a wide pot and don't overcrowd them. Cook them in batches if you need to. Cook them at a simmer, not a rolling boil. Simmer them for 40 minutes... not the 20 often recommended in recipes. Test one before you take them out... if it needs more time, keep them simmering until you find a length of time that works for your recipe. When making a lot of matzo balls, it's helpful to prepare them a day or two ahead of time so you can go at a slow and steady pace. If you try all of the above the next step would be to try another recipe to see if that helps. There are many from scratch recipes to choose from. Good luck, and let us know how the next batch turns out!



Question:
Does truffle salt need a hechsher? If so, are you aware of a brand that is kosher certified that I can find in the NYC area or on line?

Answer:
Yes, Truffle Salt (and Truffle Oil) does need a hechsher. I make my own, when I need it, so I don't have a source that I buy from. You may want to try the following sources to see if they carry any: www.koshergourmetmart.com or Pommegranate in Brooklyn. You can also make it yourself... so long as you can obtain truffles! Have fun in the kitchen! 



Question:
How many minutes should a stuffed 3 lbs chicken bake at 350 oven take and also unstuffed - I know 20 min to a lbs. The volume of the oven is same I put 2 stuffed chicken in it did not cook well please tell me what i did wrong.

Answer:
It's important to keep in mind that not all ovens run at the same temperature, even though the dial might say so. Very often, when the oven has more food in it, the cooking time needs to be extended. There's rarely a way to know this for sure, and it usually comes with experience in knowing when your foods are cooked through. I'm sure you let the chickens continue cooking until you saw by eye, that they were done... and this is the best way to use your kitchen talents! 



Question:
Can you substitute whole wheat pastry flour for matzo meal in lakes? Also, I have a recipe of my departed mom for kugel that is baked in the oven under a low heat overnight... is made with potatoes (grated) and flanken, grated onion, carrots and the necks of a chicken YUMMMMM - I just don't remember anything else, salt, pepper, etc.

Answer:
You should be able to substitute any type of flour for matzoh meal when making latkes. You may need to vary the quantities a little bit though. The whole wheat will likely give it a delicious extra taste! The kugel you mentioned sounds more like a cholent... slow cooked overnight to be ready for shabbos afternoon. Years ago it was seasoned very simply, just as you recall. Nowadays you can add seasonings! Try adding chopped garlic, dry basil and thyme. Vary it with spices that you like. Play around with it a few times until the tastes you remember come back to you. 


Question:
Every holiday I attempt to make brisket. It always comes out very tough. I dont know what i am doing wrong. I thought that if I cook it a long time it gets very soft. That doesn't seem to work. Also, I thought that if I made it in a crock pot that might help. Could you please give some advice. Thank you so much.

Answer:
You're right about cooking it a long time. Most briskets are about 5 pounds. You should cook this at 350 F. for about 3 hours. Be sure to have some liquid, (broth or a marinade), in the pan. Keep it covered, too. You can uncover it for the last few minutes of cooking to crisp the top. Cooking in a crock pot will also work, but it will need to cook for much longer! Also important is to allow the meat to rest for at least 15 minutes after it has come out of the oven. After it has rested and cooled down a bit, it will be easier to carve. It will also allow you to carve thinner slices. Be sure to use a good knife; a serrated, or electric knife will work well.


Question:
What is the best way to freeze latkes if I make them in advance.

Answer:
The most important tips to making latkes ahead of time is to be sure to fry them in hot oil to crisp them. Be sure to cook them all the way through before freezing. This will prevent them from turning brown once they're out of the freezer. Allow the latkes to drain on paper towels. Arrange them on parchment paper in single layers and seal in zip tight bags, or several layers of plastic wrap. Remove as much air as possible. To reheat, place them in a single layer on a parchment lined baking sheet and bake at 250 F. until warmed through. Use fresh parchment paper, not the same as from the freezer bags. 


Question: 
I am allergic to onion and garlic and all plants in that family. What can I use to replace these when cooking?

Answer:
If your recipes call for onions, garlic, etc. as an aromatic, try substituting cardamom, cumin or fennel seeds. If they're to be used for texture and bulk, (as in soups and stews), substitute with fresh fennel, celery, sweet or hot peppers and carrots.

No one answer will satisfy all your recipe substitutions, but you'll likely have fun figuring out which is best for your tastes!  


Question: 
In his recipe of cheesecake that uses 2 pks of vanilla pudding, what size/oz's of mix? Small package or the large package of pudding & can lemon be used instead of vanilla?

Answer:
Thanks for your e-mail! The Ricotta Cheesecake has been a hit for years! We had it on the menu at Ariel's, our dairy restaurant, and it's a featured recipe in our Adventures in Jewish Cooking cookbook, as well as part of the New Jewish Cuisine repetoire. For the recipe you will need two 3-ounce packages of instant vanilla pudding mix. You can give it a try with the lemon flavored mix. It will work within the recipe, but you may want to adjust some of the flavorings the second time around.  


Question: 
What kind of flour do I use to make the Challah Bread Bowl you made on Jewish TV Network. Is it self rising or plain and could you use wheat?

Answer:
The challah basket used all-purpose flour. You can substitute about 1/4 of it with whole wheat flour. Do not use whole wheat flour for the whole recipe or the basket will not hold form. 


Question: 
I need help with conversions on recipes to one gal. 2/3 cup, 1/3 cup, 1 tablespoon, 2 teaspoon, 1 teaspoon, into 1 gal. 

Answer:
Hello, thanks for your e-mail about converting kitchen measurements. 
There's never an exact formula for such measurements, as liquids and dry ingredients can vary by weight and volume. Without knowing exactly which ingredients you're trying to recalculate, I probably shouldn't do it for you! Instead, I recommend you go to www.onlineconversions.com to research just what you need. 
Please let me know if I can help you any further.


Question: 
Which book has your recipe for Moroccan Chicken with preserved lemons?

Answer:
Thanks for your interest in the recipes of Jeff Nathan. The Moroccan Chicken Tagine with Preserved Lemons can be found in Adventures in Jewish Cooking, on pages 114 - 115.  This recipe along with hundreds of others, are in Jeff's cookbooks, Adventures in Jewish Cooking and Jeff Nathan's Family Suppers. Both cookbooks are available through this website or through your favorite bookseller.


Question:
What is the correct pronunciation for challah? I have always heard it pronounced hallah, but my daughter in law says it's kallah. Are there different dialects, and each is correct?

Answer:
Thanks for your great question.  The correct pronunciation & spelling for the braided loaf of bread is challah. It is usually pronounced with a gutteral ch sound (almost like a scratchy throat). This sound doesn't come naturally to a lot of people, so the word hallah, with an H sound is also acceptable. The word Kallah, (with a sharp K), means bride in Hebrew.


Question:
I really enjoyed the vegetarian feast on Jewish TV Network!! I have been making pierogies for my husband of Polish heritage for 30 years. They are filled with potato and I use milk in the dough. I was interested in your use of oil in the kreplach dough, and starting thinking of it as a way to make pierogie dough softer, of course it also keeps kosher when filling with meat. I live in hot and humid Houston. Any thoughts on combining the two backgrounds to make a dough that would be like your grandma's and survive Houston? Thanks for your time, Celia

Answer:
I'm so glad you enjoyed the Vegetarian episode I did on New Jewish Cuisine. Thanks for mentioning it. Using oil in a dough provides elasticity, allowing the dough to be softer. Swapping the butter for oil should work well, though you may need to vary the quantity. This will depend on your original recipe. There's no better way to have fun in the kitchen than to combine all the aspects of our heritage... and that includes Houston!


Question:
Are you on food network?

Answer:
Thanks for asking about my tv show, New Jewish Cuisine. It is not on the Food Network, but is on public television stations throughout the country, in Israel and several other countries. You'll have to check your local listings to find when it's on in your area. I've appeared on several Food Network shows, and you can still occasionally catch my episodes... Throwdown with Bobby Flay, All About... Holidays and more!


Question:
I would like to make larger Matzo balls, mine are too small

Answer:
Thanks for contacting us!  There are a few things you might try to increase the size of your matzo balls:
- place less balls in the pot to avoid crowding as they expand.
- use a wider pot to avoid crowding as they expand.
- use a bit of baking soda, if it's not already part of the recipe you're using... but not for use during Passover.
- allow matzo balls to simmer for longer than you are currently doing.

Good luck and have fun experimenting!


Question:
I want to meet the chef !

Answer:
You made us smile! Let us know the next time you're dining at Abigael's, so Jeff can come out to meet you!


Question:
Will you ever do a show on new years dishes. I watch your show Jeff Nathan and Friends and i would love to see an hour show rosh anna recepies.

Answer: 
Thanks for the e-mail you sent regarding the television shows of Jeff Nathan on New Jewish Cuisine. Over the years we've done several holiday based shows, including Rosh Hashonah, Yom Kippur, Chanukah, Passover, Purim and Holiday Sweets episodes. The Rosh Hashonah episode featured recipes for Sweet Orange Brisket, Tzimmes and Honey Raspberry Parfait.

Take a look at some of the New Jewish Cuisine clips at
www.jewishtvnetwork.com .

Some of these recipes are in Jeff's cookbooks, Adventures in Jewish Cooking and Jeff Nathan's Family Suppers. Both cookbooks are available
through this website, or through your favorite bookseller.


Question:
Please email recipe for kasha varnishkis - i am 88 years old and i forgot what to use to make it moist - is it a soup or a gravy or what - its very dry - thank you

Answer:
Usually Kasha Varnishkas is made with a soup-style broth. However, most of this moisture get sucked into the pasta pretty quickly. A gravy style sauce is better to use, but it will also get gummy after a while. It's a dish that is just not meant for leftovers! The gravy style is also not a traditional recipe for what most of us have grown up with.

Click here for a recipe that has other ingredients to help keep the flavor moist. I hope you like it! For more of my great recipes, check out Adventures in Jewish Cooking and Jeff Nathan's Family Suppers!


Question:
Hello; love your show. My question concerns my sweet and sour stuffed cabbage, it calls for what used to be called rocksalt, what do i replace it with and how much? i usually make a 6qt pot. hope you answer soon, i really need info. thanks.

Answer:
Rock salt is a gray colored salt product that is so colored because of all its natural minerals. You will likely find it in seafood and specialty stores, as it's often used as a bedding for shellfish or as a coolant for making hand-cranked ice cream. If you can't find it, you can substitute with regular kosher salt or sour salt, which is citric based.

I can't tell you how much to use, as it will vary with the size of your recipe. Enjoy experimenting!


Question:
Can you make a whole wheat version of the Panko bread flakes?

Answer:
Thanks for your great question! Jeff is working on developing a whole wheat, as well as Passover Panko blends under the Chef Jeff line.   Hopefully we'll have the whole wheat available within the next few months.


Question:
I saw your show for the first time yesterday on the PBS Create Channel, I loved watching it. So far that's the only good thing I can say about the dtv change over. I'm at the bottom of Alabama and we don't have a lot of the information that is on your show.  My question is, what can I use in the place of white or red wine in recipes?
Thank you, Joanne

Answer:
Thanks for your great question. Depending on what you are cooking, you can substitute wines with apple juice or cider, ginger ale, grape or orange juice, brewed tea (varied flavors, depending on your recipes), or omit it entirely. let me know if you need more information.


Question:
How to make a moist boned turkey breast

Answer:
Turkey breasts are often dry because they are the leanest meat of the bird. There is no marbling of fat to add moisture while roasting.
To enhance the moistness of a turkey breast, you can try roasting it with chicken broth and vegetables at the bottom of the pan. Keep a lid on it too, to lock in moisture. This liquid can then be used to make a gravy,
once the turkey is cooked.
Brining or marinating the breast for a few hours ahead of time will also add to the moisture content.
I hope you have fun experimenting with these methods!


Question:
What is the best way to season a rib steak?

Answer:
Great question with so many answers! Rib Steaks have their own wonderful beef flavor but you can highlight the richness with basic spices from your pantry. The quickest would be a dry rub... garlic powder, onion powder, fresh ground pepper and a touch of salt. Sprinkle on both sides and cover with plastic wrap. Keep refrigerated for one hour, or overnight and turn occasionally. The natural meat juices will blend with the spices and improve the flavor the longer it rests.
You can vary the flavors with assorted chile powders or Italian or Asian flavors.
Enjoy!


Question:
Our family has started a new Christmas tradition by cooking a different menu every year (this year was Italian, last year was English). We are thinking in 2009 we want to have a typical Chanukah meal (for Christmas!). I am watching a PBS special and you are on it making some yumminess! I am curious if you could recommend a menu and/or recipes for us to try. Thank You SO Much.

Answer:
What a great idea! It sounds like a lot of fun the spend the year planning the menu and recipes.
One of Jeff's favorite food holidays is Chanukah. Probably because of all the olive oil he cooks with. A traditional meal for Chanukah would be a roasted brisket of beef, and definitely latkes (potato pancakes). The latkes, fried in oil, represent the oil that was used for the continually burning candles. You probably saw Jeff making these on his show, New Jewish Cuisine.
Some other great ideas are a hearty stew or roast veal. Desserts should always be sweet with honey to represent a sweet new year to come. Fried challah zeppoles, with a honey drizzle, or jelly donuts work great for this idea.
Most of these recipes are available in Jeff's cookbooks Adventures in Jewish Cooking and Jeff Nathan's Family Suppers.


Question:
I know that stock is made from bones and broth is made from meat, but are there differences in usage or flavor or what?

Answer:
Hi Jerry,
You are right, stock is from bones and vegetables and broth is from bone with meat attached or just meat trimmings and vegetables. They both also have seasoning like black peppercorns, parsley stems, bay leaf, thyme leaf etc....
The biggest difference is flavor. The broth will be more flavorful and can almost be a soup on it's own with just some small additions of pasta, vegetables or herbs. The stock is a flavoring tool and is used as an agent in different recipes to enhance a dish or be the beginning of a flavorful stew.
If we were making a stew we would use a stock. This way it starts as the foundation and builds flavor from the rest of the ingredients throughout the cooking process. For a broth we wouldn't need to cook it that long. It already has all the flavor built into it.

Whichever one you use will work fine. There is never mistakes in cooking. And if there is we just eat them :)


Question:
I forgot how to make hungarian cholent. I remember my mother used tongue could you help me I am 71 and visiting my Son's family in Cleveland for Rosh Hashanah.

Answer:
Hello,
Thanks for your interest in Jeff's recipes. I searched our files and found the recipe that may remind you of the one your mom used to cook.  Click here for the recipe.  I hope you enjoy varying it to bring back the taste of your mom's cooking. Happy holidays!


Question:
Can you please tell me which of your cookbooks has the recipes for challah pudding and rugalach - i mainly interested in your desserts thank you so much

Answer:
Hello,
Thanks for the e-mail you sent regarding the recipes of Jeff Nathan.
The recipes you were interested in, along with hundreds of others, are in Jeff's cookbook, Adventures in Jewish Cooking. The Challah Pudding is offered as a Challah Panzanella Salad.
This cookbook and Jeff Nathan's Family Suppers are available through this website, or through your favorite bookseller.


Question:
Hello Jeffrey,
I enjoy what your program, you recently had a program on how to brais veal, can you brais veal in a slow cooker? I know it takes hours to cook, what I did learn from you is how to cut up an onion which I also have difficulty doing that, I hope some day to meet you at your restaurants.

Answer:
Hello,
Thanks so much for watching New Jewish Cuisine. We're glad to know that you've been enjoying the show.
Yes, braised veal can be cooked in a slow cooker. If you have the time for some early preparation, we do recommend that you sear the veal roast in a hot skillet of oil on all sides before putting it in the slow cooker. This will lock in the flavors and give a nice texture to the meat.
Another little trick is to use some of the liquid that would go into the slow cooker... pour some of the liquid into the skillet that just seared the meat. Using a whisk, scrape up the little bits of stuck on flavor. Once it comes to a simmer, pour it into your slow cooker with your remaining ingredients. Talk about a flavor booster! Wow!


Question:
On TV Tues April 2 you made two soups and said this was episode 313 how do we get the recipes?

Answer:
Hello,  Thanks for the e-mail you sent regarding the recipes of Jeff Nathan. The New Jewish Cuisine recipe site is undergoing re-construction, so I've added the recipes to this website.  Click here for the recipe.  Hundreds of others are in Jeff's cookbooks, Adventures in Jewish Cooking and Jeff Nathan's Family Suppers. Both cookbooks are available through this website, or through your favorite bookseller.  Please let me know if I can help you any further.


Question:
Several years ago you were selling panko crumbs and spices. Are you still selling them, and if so, where can I purchase them?

Answer:
Hello, Thanks for contacting us about the Panko Breadflakes.  The Panko is available in many grocery stores throughout the country. If you let me know where you live, I can try to help you locate which ones in your neighborhood carry them. If you prefer, you can order it through us. The Panko is 9.00 for three (8 oz.) boxes, plus $ 7.00 shipping. We are updating our website to have this information more readily available, but it won't be up for a couple of weeks yet. The available flavors are Italian, Fine Herb and Plain. I look forward to hearing back from you.


Question:
No question. I would just like to say that watching your cable show is most entertaining. You are very personable and an easy going person "mench", and I say that in a very very good way, that you outshine the cookie cut "chef" personalities. Keep up the good work. In good time I will visit your establishment Abigaels.  Best regards.

Answer:
Hello! Thanks so much for your terrific words about Jeff and his show New Jewish Cuisine. As you can tell, he really loves what he does! I hope you enjoy watching them... we've got nearly 100 episodes so far! We look forward to having you dine with us at Abigael's!


Question:
I've seen you on create tv and watched the unmentionable show with the pan seared liver can you send me the recipe? Thank you so very much for your time, Lorie

Answer:
Hello, Thanks for the e-mail you sent regarding the recipes of Jeff Nathan. The New Jewish Cuisine recipe site is undergoing re-construction, so I've added the Pan Seared Liver, with Apple Sherry Sauce recipe on this website.  Click here for the recipe. Hundreds of other recipes are in Jeff's cookbooks, Adventures in Jewish Cooking and Jeff Nathan's Family Suppers. Both cookbooks are available through our website, or through your favorite bookseller. Please let me know if I can help you any further.


Question:
I saw your show about pistachio macaroons. I'd love the recipe, as I'd like to make them for Passover, since my daughter-in-law does not like coconut. Please help. thank you.

Answer:
Thanks for the e-mail you sent regarding the recipes of Jeff Nathan. The New Jewish Cuisine recipe site is undergoing re-construction, so I've added the Almond Pistachio Macaroons recipe to this website.   Click here for the recipe.  This recipe along with hundreds of others, are in Jeff's cookbooks, Adventures in Jewish Cooking and Jeff Nathan's Family Suppers. Both cookbooks are available through our website, or through your favorite bookseller. My apologies for not being able to send this recipe sooner, as we were overwhelmed with the Passover Holiday.  Abigael's was open, and we were hopping!  Please note that the recipe, although it is macaroons, is not for Passover, as it is made with confectioner's sugar, which is not for Passover use.  Please let me know if I can help you any further.


Question:
We saw our first "NJC" show last night here in Seattle. Wow!! this is fantastic... it was the show with Moroccan Cigars, Beggar's Purses and Tilapia in Parchment. We have a large Sephardic community and the cigars are similar to our local fare. We love your culinary enthusiasm! We will be in NYC in a few weeks...do you hold classes at the restaurant? If yes, is there a schedule. In any case, I'm sure we'll be dining at Abigail's, one of our favorites. Keep up the fun in the kitchen!

Answer:
Thanks so much for the great e-mail you sent Jeff last week. As you can tell, he really loves what he does in the kitchen, and in front of the camera!  Although Jeff does cooking demonstration for private groups, there are no classes given at Abigael's. We hope you have a chance to dine at Abigael's during your next New York visit. Until then, I hope you have a chance to sample some of Jeff's recipes at home.


Question:
I just made the most delicious appetizer using your product and wanted to share it with you. I call it Coconut-Panko Poppers. Cut chicken into bite size pieces. Dip them in flour, shake off excess. Dip them in egg. Dip them in a mixture of 1 part panko (1/2 cup) to 2 parts Coconut flakes(1cup). Bake in oven till chicken is cooked through. Put toothpicks in pieces of chicken and serve with your favorite dipping sauce. I like to use Gold's duck sauce. Wow is this ever the most delicious treat you will ever have! And so easy too!

Answer:
Hi Tzviah,

Thanks so much for sharing your Coconut Panko Poppers recipe. It sounds delicious! You can bet that my family will be eating those soon! I especially like that it doesn't have to be fried. By using the plain panko, instead of my flavored ones, the coconut taste will really come through.

Happy cooking!
Jeff


Question:
you did a brisket on your show on wends.4:00.oct. 10. i would like to get the recipe for that please. it was sort of Spanish like ingredients.

Answer:
Hello,

This is one of my favorite recipes. I hope you enjoy making it at home!

Click here for the Latin Brisket recipe.

All the best,
Jeff


Question:
Hi Jeff i seen your show on TV and you made a "lamb stew" that you covered in rice then baked it . was wondering where i can find this great recipe thanks in advance...

Answer:
Hello Anthony,

Thanks for your interest in Jeff's New Jewish Cuisine recipes a few weeks ago.

Click here for the Layered Lamb Kouresht recipe. I hope you enjoy making it at home.

All the best,
Jeff


Question:
On JTN, you mentioned your challah recipe was on your website, but I can't find it. Please help.

Answer:
Hello Devorah,

Thanks for your interest in the recipes of Chef Jeff Nathan. The New Jewish Cuisine website has been revamped, and not all the recipes are available yet.

Click here for the challah recipe you were interested in. I hope you enjoy it!

Jeff


Question:
I'm loving your cookbook. We frequent Abigael's often. want to purchase your panko bread flakes and your gumbo file, how do I do that?

Answer:
Hello,

Thanks for the e-mail you sent regarding the panko products of Jeff Nathan. The panko is available in grocery stores around the country. The ones with extensive kosher products would be more likely to have them. Depending on where you live, Shoprite, Waldbaums, Super Sol carry them. Jeff does not currently have gumbo file available. If you have trouble locating the Panko, we can mail it you.

Each 8-oz. box is $ 3.50, plus shipping. $ 3.79 +/- in the grocery stores. Currently the flavors available are ~ Plain, Fine Herb and Italian.

Please let me know if I can help you any further.

Jeff


Question:
 I am interested in a fantastic non-dairy, no fruit Kugel. I remember having something like this as a child but the cook is long gone and buried! I remain frustrated so I thought that I might get some help from Jeff. 
Thanks!

Answer:
Hi Ruth,

After much searching I realized that most of my Noodle Kugel recipes are made with dairy (and lots of it!), or with fruit. However I did come across two for you to choose from ~

1. Noodle Kugel with Sun Dried Fruits and Cinnamon Crumbs
2. Cauliflower Noodle Kugel with Herbed Almond Crust

You might also want to research some cookbooks for Yerushalyim Kugel. It has a caramel flavor. I've never come across a recipe I cared to repeat... but I'm still looking!

Also to note ~ eggs will be the best binder for any kugel you choose to make.

Let me know if you'd like either of the recipes mentioned above.

Jeff


Question:
I was watch your show today and came in late. You were making a white fish roll up of some kind but i didn't see how it was made. My husband and i love whitefish but i can not find a good recipe. If you could tell me where to find this i would be very grateful, it looked great.

Answer:
Hello,

Thanks for the e-mail you sent regarding the recipes of Jeff Nathan. Click here for the Smoked White Fish Wrap recipe.

Please let me know if I can help you any further.

Jeff


Question:
I just viewed my TIVO of your Yom Kippur "Break the Fast" recipes. Where can I get copies of these recipes? The demo is great, but U neglect to state the amount of each ingredient as U add it to the mix.

Answer:
Hello,

Thanks for the e-mail you sent regarding the recipes of Jeff Nathan. Click here for the recipes from the Yom Kippur show.

For more great recipes from Jeff, take a look at his cookbook, companion to the television series, Adventures in Jewish Cooking. This cookbook and Jeff Nathan's Family Suppers are available through us, or wherever books are sold.

Please let me know if I can help you any further.

Jeff


Question:
I just purchased your Gourmet Panko Bread Flakes and would like to know whether the item needs to be refrigerated. Also, I live in South FL, where there is much humidity. Should I store the item in its box or in a jar? Thank you.

Answer:
Hello, Thanks for the e-mail you sent regarding the Chef Jeff's Panko Bread Flakes. The breadflakes are similar to regular breadcrumbs and can be stored in the pantry, not the refrigerator. If you find that living in the humid climate of Florida that keeping your breadcrumbs fresh and crisp works better stored in the refrigerator, then you might want to do the same with the panko. Be sure that they are stored in a zip tight bag or seal-tight container, no matter where you keep them. Like breadcrumbs, the panko will last indefinitely. I hope you enjoy them! 


Question from Debby:
Hi, Jeff. I was at deGustibus today and truly enjoyed both your demo and the food. I've been before and this was by far your best "show." You were quite adamant about having a rice cooker...any brands you'd
recommend?

Can't wait to enjoy Abigael's once again!

Answer: 
Hello Debby,

Thanks for contacting us. We're so happy to know that you enjoyed the De Gustibus demonstration. It was a great event!

I don't have any special recommendations for the the rice cooker to use. We've used several types over the years, and they all seem to be similar. The last one I purchased ran about $ 60.00, and it's been well worth the expense.

Bed, Bath and Beyond had a decent selection, and with a coupon, it's even better!

Please let me know if you have any further questions. Until then, happy cooking!

Jeff